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Bradbury AR , Patrick-Miller L , Egleston B , Sands CB , Li T , Schmidheiser H , Feigon M , Ibe CN , Hlubocky FJ , Hope K , Jackson S , Corbman M , Olopade OI , Daly M , Daugherty CK
Parent Opinions Regarding the Genetic Testing of Minors for BRCA1/2
Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2010 Jul;28(21) :3498-3505
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Abstract
Purpose Although not currently recommended, genetic testing of minors for adult hereditary cancer syndromes, along with risks and benefits, is still being debated. Thus, we evaluated parent opinions regarding BRCA1/2 testing of minors, in general, and hypothetically, for parents' own minor child. Methods Semistructured interviews were conducted to assess parent opinions regarding BRCA1/2 testing in minors, along with parent rationale for and factors associated with these opinions. Results In total, 246 parents at two academic cancer risk assessment programs who underwent BRCA1/2 testing completed the interview (60% response rate). In response to a dichotomous question, 37% of parents supported testing minors. Responses to an open-ended query suggest that 47% support testing minors in some or all circumstances. Parent negative BRCA1/2 test result (P = .02), parent male sex (P = .03), and minority race (P = .01) were independently associated with support of testing minors. In response to a dichotomous question, 44% of parents reported hypothetical interest in testing their own minor offspring. Responses to an open-ended query suggest that 55% would consider, hypothetically, testing their child in some or all circumstances. Parent negative test result (P = .01), less than a college education (P = .01), and older mean offspring age (P = .05) were associated with interest in testing one's own child. Conclusion Parents' opinions regarding BRCA1/2 testing of minors are divided. Given the lack of evidence supporting either the permission or restriction of BRCA1/2 testing in minors, further evaluation of the risks and benefits of providing genetic risk information and genetic testing to minors for adult-onset disease is needed to inform clinical practice and guidelines.
Notes
Bradbury, Angela R. Patrick-Miller, Linda Egleston, Brian Sands, Colleen Burke Li, Tianyu Schmidheiser, Helen Feigon, Maia Ibe, Comfort N. Hlubocky, Fay J. Hope, Kisha Jackson, Sarah Corbman, Melanie Olopade, Olufunmilayo I. Daly, Mary Daugherty, Christopher K. Amer soc clinical oncology Alexandria 626ye