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Martinez E , Tatum KL , Glass M , Bernath A , Ferris D , Reynolds P , Schnoll RA
Correlates of smoking cessation self-efficacy in a community sample of smokers
Addictive Behaviors. 2010 Feb;35(2) :175-178
PMID: ISI:000272763600019    PMCID: PMC2783543   
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Abstract
While numerous studies show that higher levels of smoking cessation self-efficacy predicts motivation to quit smoking and successful smoking cessation, few studies have evaluated factors related to smoking cessation self-efficacy that could be targets of behavioral interventions to promote greater confidence to quit smoking. This study, using a large community sample of smokers enrolled in a smoking cessation treatment program, evaluated potential associations between self-efficacy to quit smoking and demographic (e.g., age, race), smoking-related (e.g., rate, cessation history, past use of treatments), and psychosocial (e.g., stress, cue reactivity. self-medication smoking) variables. The results indicated that Hispanic-American smokers, relative to smokers of other racial/ethnic groups, report significantly lower self-efficacy to quit smoking when facing internal stimuli (e.g., feeling depressed), as do smokers who report that they have little confidence to control abstinence-induced symptoms (F(9,576)=6.9, p<.001). The results also indicated that smokers who reported that they have little confidence to control abstinence-induced symptoms and report high smoking urge reactivity to Situations that illicit positive affect (e.g., at a bar, with coffee, at a party) report lower self-efficacy to quit smoking when facing external stimuli (e.g., during a celebration; F [7,600] = 9.05, p <.05). These findings can be used to refine behavioral smoking cessation interventions to increase self-efficacy to quit smoking. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Notes
Martinez, Elisa Tatum, Kristina L. Glass, Marcella Bernath, Albert Ferris, Daron Reynolds, Patrick Schnoll, Robert A. American Cancer Society [RSCPB-05-240-01-CPPB]; National Institutes of Health [U10 101178]; [P50 DA02585]; [R01 CA126969]; [R01 DA025078]; [R21 DA026889] This study was funded by grant RSCPB-05-240-01-CPPB to Dr.Schnoll from the American Cancer Society and National Institutes of Health grant U10 101178 to Dr. Paul Engstrom. This study was also supported in part by grants: P50 DA02585. R01 CA126969, R01 DA025078. and R21 DA026889. The funding sources had no additional role in the study. 32 Pergamon-elsevier science ltd; the boulevard, langford lane, kidlington, oxford ox5 1gb, england 532qd