FCCC LOGO Faculty Publications
Ramcharan J , Colleluori DM , Merkel G , Andrake MD , Skalka AM
Mode of inhibition of HIV-I integrase by a C-terminal domain-specific monoclonal antibody
RETROVIROLOGY . 2006 ;3 :34
Back to previous list
Abstract
Background: To further our understanding of the structure and function of HIV-1 integrase ( IN) we developed and characterized a library of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) directed against this protein. One of these antibodies, mAb33, which is specific for the C-terminal domain, was found to inhibit HIV-1 IN processing activity in vitro; a corresponding Fv fragment was able to inhibit HIV-1 integration in vivo. Our subsequent studies, using heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, identified six solvent accessible residues on the surface of the C-terminal domain that were immobilized upon binding of the antibody, which were proposed to comprise the epitope. Here we test this hypothesis by measuring the affinity of mAb33 to HIV-1 proteins that contain Ala substitutions in each of these positions. To gain additional insight into the mode of inhibition we also measured the DNA binding capacity and enzymatic activities of the Ala substituted proteins. Results: We found that Ala substitution of any one of five of the putative epitope residues, F223, R224, Y226, I267, and I268, caused a decrease in the affinity of the mAb33 for HIV-1 IN, confirming the prediction from NMR data. Although IN derivatives with Ala substitutions in or near the mAb33 epitope exhibited decreased enzymatic activity, none of the epitope substitutions compromised DNA binding to full length HIV-1 IN, as measured by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Two of these derivatives, IN (1276A) and IN (1267A/I268A), exhibited both increased DNA binding affinity and uncharacteristic dissociation kinetics; these proteins also exhibited nonspecific nuclease activity. Results from these investigations are discussed in the context of current models for how the C-terminal domain interacts with substrate DNA. Conclusion: It is unlikely that inhibition of HIV-1 IN activity by mAb33 is caused by direct interaction with residues that are essential for substrate binding. Rather our findings are most consistent with a model whereby mAb33 binding distorts or constrains the structure of the C-terminal domain and/or blocks substrate binding indirectly. The DNA binding properties and nonspecific nuclease activity of the 1267A derivatives suggest that the C-terminal domain of IN normally plays an important role in aligning the viral DNA end for proper processing.
Notes
5t32ca009035/ca/nci Ai40385/ai/niaid Ca006927/ca/nci Journal Article Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't England