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Schnoll RA , Martinez E , Tatum KL , Glass M , Bernath A , Ferris D , Reynolds P
Nicotine patch vs. nicotine lozenge for smoking cessation: an effectiveness trial coordinated by the Community Clinical Oncology Program
Drug Alcohol Depend. 2010 Mar 1;107(2-3) :237-43
PMID: 20004065    PMCID: PMC2834192    URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20004065
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Abstract
BACKGROUND: Nicotine replacement therapies are efficacious for treating nicotine dependence. However, limited data exist on benefits of different NRTs and predictors of treatment outcome. This study compared the effectiveness of transdermal nicotine vs. nicotine lozenge for smoking cessation and identified predictors of treatment response. METHODS: A randomized, open-label effectiveness trial was conducted at 12 medical sites participating in the National Cancer Institute's Community Clinical Oncology Program. The sample consisted of 642 treatment-seeking smokers randomized to 12 weeks of transdermal nicotine or nicotine lozenge. RESULTS: Smoker characteristics were assessed at baseline, and 24-h point prevalence abstinence confirmed with breath carbon monoxide (CO) was evaluated at end of treatment (EOT) and at a 6-month follow-up. There was a trend for higher quit rates for transdermal nicotine vs. nicotine lozenge at EOT (24.3% vs. 18.7%, p=.10) and 6 months (15.6% vs. 10.9%, p=.10). A logistic regression model of EOT quit rates showed smokers who preferred transdermal nicotine, were not reactive to smoking cues, and did not use nicotine to alleviate distress or stimulate cognitive function had higher quit rates on transdermal nicotine. A logistic regression model of 6-month quit rates showed smokers who preferred transdermal nicotine had higher quit rates on transdermal nicotine, and smokers who used nicotine to alleviate distress or stimulate cognitive processes had lower quit rates on nicotine lozenge. CONCLUSIONS: Transdermal nicotine may be more effective than nicotine lozenge for smokers who prefer transdermal nicotine and do not smoke to alleviate emotional distress or stimulate cognitive function.
Notes
Schnoll, Robert A Martinez, Elisa Tatum, Kristina L Glass, Marcella Bernath, Albert Ferris, Daron Reynolds, Patrick eng U10 101178/PHS HHS/ R21 DA026889-01/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ R01 CA126969-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ R01 DA025078-01A1/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ R01 CA126969/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ P50 CA143187-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ R21 DA026889/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ U10 CA101178-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ P50 CA143187/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ R01 DA025078/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ U10 CA101178/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ Clinical Trial, Phase IV Comparative Study Multicenter Study Randomized Controlled Trial Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't Ireland Drug Alcohol Depend. 2010 Mar 1;107(2-3):237-43. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2009.11.001. Epub 2009 Dec 9.