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Manne S, Kashy D, Albrecht T, Wong YN, Flamm AL, Benson AB, Miller SM, Fleisher L, Buzaglo J, Roach N, Katz M, Ross E, Collins M, Poole D, Raivitch S, Miller DM, Kinzy TG, Liu T, Meropol NJ
Knowledge, Attitudes, and Self-efficacy as Predictors of Preparedness for Oncology Clinical Trials: A Mediational Model
Medical Decision Making (2014) 34:454-463.
Abstract
Objective. This study used the Ottawa Decision Support Framework to evaluate a model examining associations between clinical trial knowledge, attitudinal barriers to participating in clinical trials, clinical trial self-efficacy, and clinical trial preparedness among 1256 cancer patients seen for their first outpatient consultation at a cancer center. As an exploratory aim, moderator effects for gender, race/ethnicity, education, and metastatic status on associations in the model were evaluated. Methods. Patients completed measures of cancer clinical trial knowledge, attitudinal barriers, self-efficacy, and preparedness. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was conducted to evaluate whether self-efficacy mediated the association between knowledge and barriers with preparedness. Results. The SEM explained 26% of the variance in cancer clinical trial preparedness. Self-efficacy mediated the associations between attitudinal barriers and preparedness, but self-efficacy did not mediate the knowledge-preparedness relationship. Conclusions. Findings partially support the Ottawa Decision Support Framework and suggest that assessing patients' level of self-efficacy may be just as important as evaluating their knowledge and attitudes about cancer clinical trials.
Note
Publication Date: 2014-05-01.
PMCID: PMC3991731
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