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Schnoll RA, Rothman RL, Wielt DB, Lerman C, Pedri H, Wang H, Babb J, Miller SM, Movsas B, Sherman E, Ridge JA, Unger M, Langer C, Goldberg M, Scott W, Cheng J
A randomized pilot study of cognitive-behavioral therapy versus basic health education for smoking cessation among cancer patients
Ann Behav Med (2005) 30:1-11.
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Previously, we have linked theoretically based cognitive and emotional variables to the ability of cancer patients to quit smoking. Purpose: In this study, we evaluated the impact of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), which addressed these theoretically derived cognitive and emotional variables linked to tobacco use in this population, for promoting smoking cessation in a sample of cancer patients and assessed longitudinal predictors of smoking cessation. METHODS: Cancer patients (N=109) were randomized to either the theoretically based CBT intervention or to a general health education (GHE) condition, and all patients received nicotine replacement therapy. RESULTS: Contrary to our expectation, no significant difference in 30-day point-prevalence abstinence between the CBT and GHE conditions was detected at either a 1-month (44.9 vs. 47.3%, respectively) or 3-month (43.2% vs. 39.2%, respectively) follow-up evaluation. Higher quit motivation and lower cons of quitting were related to smoking cessation. CONCLUSIONS: Implications for the implementation of smoking cessation behavioral treatments in the oncologic context are discussed, as are directions for future research in this area.
Note
Publication Date: 2005-08-01.
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